U.S. Paralympics Swimming


Becca Meyers poses after winning gold at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games.

About Para Swimming

Para swimming for men and women has been a part of the Paralympic program since the first Games in 1960 in Rome, Italy. Today, the races are highly competitive and among the largest and most popular events in the Paralympic Games. Paralympic swimming competitions occur in 50-meter pools and, while competing, no prostheses or assistive devices may be worn.

Paralympic swimming competition is open to male and female athletes with physical disabilities such as dwarfism, amputation/limb loss, blindness/visual impairment, spinal cord injury/wheelchair-users, cerebral palsy/brain injury/stroke, cognitive impairment, and Les autres.

World Para Swimming, under the governance of the International Paralympic Committee, acts as the international federation for the sport and is based in Bonn, Germany. Competition opportunities include the Paralympic Games every four years, biennial World Championships, and biennial or quadrennial regional Championships. The World Series, featuring a number of swim meets around the world, was launched in 2017 to provide greater classification opportunities and top-level competition opportunities for athletes.

Paralympic Games Host Cities
1960 - Rome, Italy
1964 - Tokyo, Japan
1968 - Tel Aviv, Israel
1972 - Heidelberg, Germany
1976 - Toronto, Canada
1980 - Arnhem, Netherlands
1984 - Stoke Mandeville, Great Britain/New York, United States
1988 - Seoul, South Korea
1992 - Barcelona, Spain
1996 - Atlanta, United States
2000 - Sydney, Australia
2004 - Athens, Greece
2008 - Beijing, China
2012 - London, Great Britain
2016 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2021 - Tokyo, Japan
2024 - Paris, France
2028 - Los Angeles, United States
 

Team USA Total Medals by Paralympic Games
Year - Host City - Total Medals - Gold, Silver, Bronze
2016 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 115 - 40 gold, 44 silver, 31 bronze
2012 - London, Great Britain - 98 - 31 gold, 29 silver, 38 bronze
2008 - Beijing, China - 99 - 36 gold, 35 silver, 28 bronze
2004 - Athens, Greece - 88 - 27 gold, 22 silver, 39 bronze
2000 - Sydney, Australia - 109 - 36 gold, 39 silver, 34 bronze
1996 - Atlanta, United States - 157 - 46 gold, 46 silver, 65 bronze
1992 - Barcelona, Spain - 175 - 75 gold, 52 silver, 48 bronze
1988 - Seoul, South Korea - 269 - 91 gold, 90 silver, 88 bronze
1984 - Stoke Mandeville, Great Britain/New York, United States - 397 - 137 gold, 131 silver, 129 bronze
1980 - Arnhem, Netherlands - 195 - 75 gold, 66 silver, 54 bronze
1976 - Toronto, Canada - 155 - 66 gold, 44 silver, 45 bronze
1972 - Heidelberg, Germany - 75 - 17 gold, 27 silver, 31 bronze
1968 - Tel Aviv, Israel - 99 - 33 gold, 27 silver, 39 bronze
1964 - Tokyo, Japan - 123 - 50 gold, 41 silver, 32 bronze
1960 - Rome, Italy - 25 - 11 gold, 7 silver, 7 bronze

Team USA Total Swimming Medals by Games
Year - Host City - Total Medals - Gold, Silver, Bronze
2016 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 37 - 14 gold, 14 silver, 9 bronze
2012 - London, Great Britain - 41 - 14 gold, 13 silver, 14 bronze
2008 - Beijing, China - 44 - 17 gold, 14 silver, 13 bronze
2004 - Athens, Greece - 35 - 16 gold, 4 silver, 15 bronze
2000 - Sydney, Australia - 39 - 15 gold, 17 silver, 7 bronze
1996 - Atlanta, United States - 45 - 16 gold, 13 silver, 16 bronze
1992 - Barcelona, Spain - 57 - 29 gold, 16 silver, 12 bronze
1988 - Seoul, South Korea - 83 - 33 gold, 28 silver, 22 bronze
1984 - Stoke Mandeville, Great Britain/New York, United States - 110 - 38 gold, 29 silver, 43 bronze
1980 - Arnhem, Netherlands - 56 - 21 gold, 15 silver, 20 bronze
1976 - Toronto, Canada - 35 - 17 gold, 5 silver, 13 bronze
1972 - Heidelberg, Germany - 9 - 1 gold, 3 silver, 5 bronze
1968 - Tel Aviv, Israel - 30 - 12 gold, 10 silver, 8 bronze
1964 - Tokyo, Japan - 54 - 22 gold, 18 silver, 14 bronze
1960 - Rome, Italy - 14 - 3 gold, 6 silver, 5 bronze