U.S. Paralympics Cyc... Features Cycling Roundup: The...

Cycling Roundup: The 2021 Season Has A Schedule, Cyclists Celebrate Thanksgiving, And More

By By Paul D. Bowker | Dec. 09, 2020, 6:49 p.m. (ET)

Every other week we scour the web for the latest going on in the world of U.S. Para-cycling. Here’s what you missed!

 

U.S. Paralympics Cycling Open To Begin 2021 Season

 

The U.S. Paralympics Cycling Open in April will kick off a calendar of four U.S. Paralympics Cycling domestic events prior to the start of the postponed Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020. The Paralympic Games begin Aug. 24, 2021.

 

More than 100 athletes are expected to compete in the U.S. Paralympics Cycling Open, which is scheduled for April 17 and 18 in Huntsville, Alabama. The event, to be held at Cummings Research Park in Huntsville, is the second selection event for the Tokyo Paralympic Games.

 

The U.S. Paralympic Team Trials for Cycling will be held June 18-20 in Minneapolis, which is the final qualification opportunity for Tokyo. The 2021 Para-cycling Track National Championships are set for June 29 through July 4 in Carson, California, followed by 2021 Para-cycling Road National Championships on July 8-10 in Boise, Idaho.

 

“After an unprecedented 2020 season, we’re excited to be able to resume competition safely in 2021 and give our athletes opportunities to get back on the road and track as they prepare for an important year,” said Ian Lawless, director of U.S. Paralympics Cycling.

 

For more details, go here:

 

U.S. Paralympics Cycling Announces Full 2021 Domestic Schedule, Beginning in Huntsville in April (teamusa.org)

 

Celebrating Thanksgiving

 

U.S. Para-cyclists celebrated Thanksgiving in a number of ways. And they were eager to share those celebrations with fans on social media.

 

For two-time Paralympic medalist Samantha Bosco, it’s all about pie, sweatpants and friends.

 

And we love the Santa hat on the Christmas tree, sammiecranks.

 

 

More pies, pies, pies in the Gaertner home:

 

 

 

And how about some turkey-shaped butter?

 

 

 

Just feeling a bit sick, but very thankful …

 

 

 

We took a look at what some members of the national team were thankful for following the Thanksgiving weekend.

 

And On Giving Tuesday ….

 

Oksana Masters was one of many Paralympians to take part in Giving Tuesday, the annual global generosity movement encouraging people to give money, time, and more to support their community. Masters posted a video on Instagram to promote acts of kindness.

 

Around The Socials

 

Two-time Olympic figure skater Sasha Cohen interviewed Brandon Lyons, a member of the U.S. Paralympics Cycling Team, to share his inspiring story. Lyons was paralyzed in 2014 after diving into shallow water and fracturing his T5/T6 vertebrae. Lyons discovered handcycling while working out at a rehabilitation gym in 2016, and by 2017 earned a spot in the residence program at the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Training Center.

 

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Samantha Bosco, who has won 10 world championship medals and captured two bronze medals during her Paralympic Games debut in Rio in 2016, was reclassified from C5 to C4 over the last year. She has an inspirational way of looking at her disability; she had part of her leg removed as a child due to being born with a bowed tibia.

 

“Despite its constant presence,” Bosco wrote on her Instagram account, “I don’t often think of myself as having a disability. My parents helped instill in me that a disability is not a limitation, that I am still strong and capable, and that I can do anything I want in life.”

  

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U.S. Para-cyclist Clara Brown shared a cool video on International Day of Persons with Disabilities day on December 3.

 

 

 

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Two-time Paralympic gold medalist Travis Gaertner shows precisely how to get up high for a home improvement project. Take note, Bob Vila.

 

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Six-time Paralympic medalist Oz Sanchez went for the chimney when the power went out.

 


By Paul D. Bowker

Paul D. Bowker has been writing about Olympic sports since 1996, when he was an assistant bureau chief in Atlanta. He is a freelance contributor to TeamUSA.org on behalf of Red Line Editorial, Inc.