Rest in Peace Enoch Green

By Larry Hodges and Ray Arditi | Nov. 02, 2019, 10:08 a.m. (ET)
R.I.P. Enoch Green
 
Rest in Peace Enoch Green
 
Enoch was the Head Coach of my former Liberty Bell TTC, where he. was affectionately dubbed Enoch "the Spin Wizard" Green. He was a pioneer in holistic table tennis being a vegetarian long before going vegan became trendy. He was largely self-taught but a real student of the game. In his home, a virtual table tennis castle replete with minerals and gemstones, he poured over videos of the Swedish and Chinese matches. Unknown to the tt world, he invented a tt training device which strengthened the grip and wrist, enabling Enoch to develop his uniquely  "Green Grip." He had his own art studio within the Liberty Bell TTC, where he designed incredibly awesome stained glass creations. Bob "Dr. Serve" Waxler and I wondered if breathing the toxic fumes from the paints may have caused some of his health issues. We'll never know.

Enoch was an innovative coach, taking a deep interest in his students. As a student myself, I got everything from the steps involved in executing a Swedish loop to the benefits of Ehret's grape fast diet. He was a a wonderful coach who added unseen dimensions to his pupil's game. Enoch was definitely ahead of the times. TT was his way of life to the very end. Hank Mc Coullum,  his close friend and others tried to buoy his spirits but despite the various therapies it was too late

RIP Enoch. If there is a tt heaven, I know you'll be there waiting for us.   
 
-Ray Arditi
 

R.I.P. Enoch Green

 
Enoch was a towering figure in the table tennis world back in the 1980s and 1990s – both in height (about 6’4”) and table tennis skill, which was over 2300. He and I often talked table tennis – he had many theories on the sport. He was at his best as a chopper with long pips who could also attack, but played almost as well with inverted on both sides, where he’d block and loop equally well. He would sometimes serve big, breaking sidespin serves using the penhold grip, do a conventional penhold backhand jab block on the first shot, then switch to shakehands chopping – and then, when he got a weak ball, would switch to the Seemiller grip and smack in a backhand winner. I played him a number of times and several times faced three shots in succession with all three grips – penhold, shakehand, Seemiller! He often visited us in the Maryland/Virginia/DC area, though he mostly played and coached in Philadelphia.
 
-Larry Hodges