Teeing Up for a Good Cause

Oct. 03, 2011, 12:53 p.m. (ET)

I’ve mentioned my involvement with the David Andrew “Pooh” Maddan Foundation, also known as DAM-Cancer, in past blog entries (see “Poohstrong”).  He was a good friend who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma at the age of 25 and battled his cancer for three years before losing his life due to complications with treatment.  This foundation was set up to help young adults, age 18-35, who are battling cancer.  These individuals receive financial assistance for transportation costs, housing, food, insurance premiums, dental expenses as well as medications and supplies not covered by insurance. 

 

Last Friday was the third annual DAM-Cancer Foundation golf tournament.  It is held at the Presidio golf course in San Francisco and is a fun day of good friends, fresh air, and golf.  We come together to celebrate a lost friend and support the charity set up in his honor.  Without hesitation, people rearrange their schedules and figure out a way to attend this tournament every year.

 

I’ve golfed 18 holes twice in my life: this year’s tournament and last year’s tournament.  Being a competitive athlete it’s difficult for me to be so bad at something athletic, but it’s for a good cause.  Thank goodness we play a scramble format, otherwise my foursome would be out there way too long. I had some pretty decent shots this year mixed in with some really terrible ones.  We even used my shots a few times! Even though I’m terrible, I had a blast and so did everyone else.

 

This year one of the foundation’s recipients spoke at the dinner following our afternoon of golf.  She spoke about graduating from graduate school and finding out days later that she had a rare form of cancer.  Even though she has insurance, it doesn’t cover all of her treatment and the bills pill up.  It wasn’t until I heard her story that I fully realized how much DAM-Cancer has positively affected so many young adults.  This young, thirty-something woman spoke of the foundation’s generosity while choking back heartfelt tears of gratitude.  She looked at David’s mother (Anna Maddan, who tirelessly works for DAM-Cancer) and said, “I don’t even know you, but I love you.  Thank you.” 

 

DAM-Cancer isn’t a huge foundation, but it is growing every year.  It’s helped over 50 individuals over the past few years and continues to help more.  Less than 2% of the money that DAM-Cancer earns goes towards operating costs.  The remaining 98% goes directly towards individuals in need.  I highly encourage you all to check out the website: www.DAM-Cancer.org and learn more about an incredible foundation. 

 

DAM-Cancer isn’t a huge foundation, but it is growing every year.  It’s helped over 50 individuals over the past few years and continues to help more.  Less than 2% of the money that DAM-Cancer earns goes towards operating costs.  The remaining 98% goes directly towards individuals in need.  I highly encourage you all to check out the website: www.DAM-Cancer.org and learn more about an incredible foundation.