Trigger Squeeze

By Dennis Bowsher | May 02, 2018, 4 a.m. (ET)

The trigger squeeze is a very important part of shooting. The index finger needs to move independently from the rest of the hand. If other parts of your hand engage during the trigger squeeze, it can cause small movements that move your sights off target.  The index finger needs to move back with pressure that is evenly increasing as you are pulling the trigger through the shot.  If you pull too fast or too hard, that can cause you to ‘jerk’ the trigger and alter your shot. When your shot goes off, it needs to be a solid red light on the target, not a streak. A streak is a sudden movement of the barrel which can be caused by jerking the trigger. The following set can help isolate the trigger squeeze so you can really focus on what your index finger is doing as it is pulling the trigger:

Sitting in a chair, pistol on your lap, get a normal grip; 10x10 trigger squeezes with eyes closed, charging the pistol for each shot; don’t rush through all 10 shots, really feel the finger squeezing the trigger.

Standing and aiming at a wall, normal shooting position; 10x5 lifts, closing your eyes and then starting your trigger squeeze, charge the pistol for each shot; same as above, don’t rush and really think about how you are squeezing the trigger.

Standing and aiming at a wall, normal shooting position; 10x5 shots with eyes open, working on a smooth trigger squeeze; again, don’t rush and make every shot a perfect shot.

Comment below with any questions.