President

Caryn Davies

Caryn Davies was elected president of the United States Olympians and Paralympians Association (USOPA) in 2021. She previously served as a vice president from 2008-2012 and 2016-2019. She also served as athlete representative to the USRowing Board of Directors from 2004-2010.

Caryn represented Team USA in the women’s eight-oared event at three Olympic Games. She competed in her first Games in 2004, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, where she and her teammates won the silver medal. Four years later, her boat won gold at the Olympic Games Beijing 2008. In 2012, she won another gold at the Olympic Games London 2012 while simultaneously earning her law degree from Columbia Law School.

Davies retired from elite competition after the London Games. Over the next seven years, she clerked on the Ninth Circuit Federal Court of Appeals in Honolulu, won a Hawaii state championship in outrigger canoeing, completed an MBA at Oxford, won the Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race, and worked as a corporate attorney at a large Boston law firm. In 2019, Caryn came out of retirement to train for the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 but did not make the Olympic team due to injury.

Caryn now has her own law practice in Boston, but her real passions are sharing the lessons she has learned as an athlete with people hoping to achieve their own peak performance and helping athletes transition from elite competition to a successful career.

Vice Presidents

Bob Balk

Bob Balk was elected to the United States Olympians and Paralympians Association executive committee and began serving as a vice president in July 2021.

Bob is six-time Paralympian and Paralympic medalist in track and field and skiing but has participated in a wide range of other sports, including canoe/kayak and bobsled, at the national team level. He brings to the USOPA executive committee a broad perspective across a wide range of sports. 

Bob has also been very active in several volunteer administrative roles in the movement over the past decades. Bob served on the USOC Athletes’ Advisory Council and was very quickly asked to join the USOC Governance and Ethics Task force in 2003 during a very difficult time. In 2004 he was elected to the International Paralympic Committee’s Athletes’ Council, and in 2008 he was re-elected and elected by the AC to be chairperson. This role brought on several ex-officio positions, including a seat on the IPC Governing Board and the International Olympic Committee’s Athletes’ Commission. During the entirety of his ten-year tenure, he always took his ex-officio role on the USOC AAC very seriously and only missed one meeting due to the birth of his children in 2006. He is frequently called upon by AAC members for his perspective on various topics important to athletes. 

Bob’s education is in finance, with corporate experience in strategy and business development in the aerospace industry. Bob is currently involved with Pier70 ventures as a founding managing director. 

Bob is a member of the Paralympic Order, the highest honor in the Paralympic Movement. 

Bob currently lives in upstate New York.

Bruce M. Furniss

Bruce Furniss was elected a vice president of the United States Olympians and Paralympians Association for the 2021-2024 quadrennial.

Bruce was a 1976 swimming two-time Olympic gold medalist and won two gold and two silver medals at the world championships in 1975 and 1978. During his career, Bruce broke ten world records, nineteen American records and garnered eleven AAU and six NCAA national titles. Swimming for the University of Southern California from 1975 to 1979, he was an integral part of two national championship winning teams.

He is one of three Americans (Mark Spitz and Michael Phelps being the other two) to ever win the Olympic 200-meter freestyle. Along with his brother, Steve, he is among a rare group of siblings to make the same Olympic team. The Furniss brothers share two unique distinctions as the only siblings to ever break one another’s world record and as members of the last swim club relay team to break a swimming world record.

Bruce has been inducted into the International Swimming, Orange County Sports, USC Athletic and the Aquatic Capital of America Hall of Fames. He has received the NCAA Silver Anniversary Award and in 2020 was inducted into the COSIDA Academic Hall of Fame. He is a member of USA Swimming’s Swim Team of the 20th Century and of the Pac-12 Conference’s All-Century swim team. 

Bruce is a successful commercial real estate broker and affordable housing expert. He is a former member of USA Swimming’s board of directors and sits on the boards of the Swim with Mike, David X. Marks and Koroibos Foundations.

Craig Gilbert

Craig Gilbert began serving as a vice president on the United States Olympians and Paralympians Association executive committee in 2022. He has served as the president of the New York/New Jersey/Connecticut Chapter of USOPA since 2017.

He is a 1984 Olympian who competed in team handball at the Olympic Games Los Angeles 1984. Craig was a member of the United States junior and senior national teams, competed in two Pan American championships and was the captain of the 1980 United States World University Games Team Handball Team.

Craig joined the board of directors of the Olympians for Olympians Relief Fund in 2018 and served for three years. The OORF is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization funded by United States Olympians and Paralympians through tax-deductible contributions to provide “A Helping Hand for Olympians & Paralympians in Need.”

He is a cyber security professional currently working for BNY Mellon and also served in the United States Army as an Infantry Officer retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel after his last active duty assignment in Afghanistan, where he was awarded a Bronze Star. He is an active member of the New York Athletic Club, one of the most celebrated Athletic Clubs in the world, as well as the Swim and Sports Club of Flanders, New Jersey that was a club instrumental in starting the United States Team Handball Federation, which is now USA Team Handball.

Craig graduated from the United States Military Academy and has been instrumental in facilitating a number of Olympic-related projects, with his wife Gretchen, at the Academy honoring the 89 West Pointers who competed in the Olympic Games. He also earned an Executive MBA at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and a MS from Stevens Institute of Technology in the management of technology.

Sharon A. Jewell

Sharon A. Jewell was elected to serve as a vice president for the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians Association for the 2021-2024 quadrennial.

Sharon is a 1988 Olympic bronze medalist, who started the sport of taekwondo on a bet. She has the fastest kick (Ap Chagi) of any male/female at 39 MPH and was ranked no. 1 in the U.S. for nine years. Sharon won more than 10 international/national gold medals, five silver medals and five bronze medals. She served as women’s team captain (1984, 1985) and overall team captain (1984, 1989 and 1990). Sharon medaled in every competition of her entire 14-year taekwondo career. She delivered nine knockouts and one-technical knockout.

An Arkansas native with advocacy/civil rights in her DNA. Sharon is a Little Rock Central High School Hall of Fame track inductee (1978). Sharon received a full academic and NCAA Division I track scholarship to Howard University from Olympic Coach William “Bill” Moultrie. She was a MEAC Conference 110 hurdle champion, five-time Taekwondo Collegiate Champion (1980-1984) and four-time National Collegiate Taekwondo Athlete of the Year (1980-1983).

Continuing advocacy while an athlete, Sharon was appointed first female athlete/first African American female to serve on USAT Executive Committee/Board of Directors. She was selected chairperson for USAT Junior Olympic, AAC, Women’s AAC. Sharon served as USOC AAC athlete alternate (1984-1992) and USOC Athlete Support Committee.

After competition, Sharon focused on ethical issues. Sharon became the first African American female international referee representing U.S. in 2017. Sharon serves on World Taekwondo Integrity Committee regarding SafeSport, ethics and governance.

Sharon served as charter member/secretary, vice-president and president of the NEOPA Chapter. Now a five-time hall of famer (HU-’97, USTGS-2016, OITHOF- ‘2017), she serves as member/secretary for recently formed National African American Wrestling Hall of Fame, and volunteer community ambassador with the Team USA Council on Racial and Social Justice. 

Sharon earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology and received an MBA with distinction from Keller Graduate School of Management.

John Moffet

John Moffet was elected to the executive committee of the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians Association in 2021.He is the current president of the Southern California chapter of USOPA. 

John was a member of the 1980 (boycotted) and 1984 Olympic Swimming Team and is a former world record holder in the breaststroke. While at Stanford University, he was a five-time individual NCAA champion and two-time team champion. During his senior year, John was awarded the NCAA Top VI Award honoring the six most outstanding student-athletes in the nation. He has been elected to the Stanford Athletic Hall of Fame and the Pac-12 All-Century Team. He also received the Congressional Gold Medal from President Carter because of the Moscow Olympic boycott. 

Since retiring from athletics, John has produced hundreds of hours of television and is the recipient of three Primetime Emmy Awards as supervising producer of The Amazing Race. He currently serves on the board of directors of LA Sports Council, Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games, and Ready, Set Gold! John and his wife (another Stanford swimmer) reside in Los Angeles and have two college-age children.

Lydia R. Murphy-Stephans

Lydia was elected to serve as a vice president on the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians Executive Committee in 2021.

She is currently the CEO & founder of SportsBubble LLC, a sports marketing and media services company. 

Lydia has built and led businesses for the Pacific Athletic Conference, MSG Media/Cablevision, Oxygen Media and ABC/Disney. Her hands-on, best practices management style was put into action with the creation of Pac-12 Networks, the rebranding of MSG Networks, the launch of Oxygen media and the global oversight of ABC’s Wide World of Sports. In winning 24 Emmy awards, Lydia’s reputation as a versatile media executive was solidified. 

Lydia has served in leadership roles on numerous for profit and non-profit boards, including Octagon’s Global Media Rights Advisory Board, Lifetime Television’s Board of Directors, NYC2012’s Olympic Bid Committee, Women’s Sports Foundation’s Board of Directors, and U.S. Speed Skating Association’s Board of Directors.

Lydia was a member of the 1984 U.S. Olympic Speedskating Team. In 1994, she was inducted into the Amateur Skating Union’s Hall of Fame.

Immediate Past President

Dick Fosbury

Dick Fosbury was elected vice president of the U.S. Olympians Association in 2004, serving until he was elected president of the United States Olympians and Paralympians Association from 2016-2021. Dick also founded the Idaho Chapter of USOA in 2007 and served as president of the World Olympian Association from 2007-2011.

Dick became an Olympic champion in the high hump event at the Olympic Games Mexico City 1968, setting and Olympic Games and national record, clearing 7’ – 4 ¼” (2.24m) while introducing a new technique called the ‘Fosbury Flop’.

This technique has revolutionized the high jump event and led to his being inducted in the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1992, as well as many other international, national and local halls of fame. Dick has remained active, coaching kids with his Dick Fosbury Track Camp and Simplot Games Track Camp, and as chair of the Simplot Games in Pocatello, Idaho.

Dick graduated with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering technology and became licensed as a civil engineer and land surveyor in the state of Idaho. He also was co-founder and president of Galena Engineering, Inc, until retiring in 2011. Dick was elected as Blaine County Commissioner in 2018 and is serving as chairman.

Past Presidents

Gary Hall Sr.

Since retiring in 2006 as a physician, Dr. Gary Hall has now dedicated his life to swim coaching technique and swim training methods to help children, masters, fitness and health swimmers, and triathletes at The Race Club in Coronado, California. He brings his science background, knowledge and experience in swim stroke mechanics and a strong passion for swimming to offer an unsurpassed quality of teaching at the club or through online coaching. Swimmers of all ages and abilities come from around the world to learn from and be inspired by Gary and give themselves the lifetime gift of swimming.

Gary has held 10 world swimming records. In 1969 and 1970, he was named World Swimmer of the Year. In the 1970 NCAA swimming championship, he alone scored a record 56.5 points. He was a leader as captain of the Indiana University swim team that in his senior year won its sixth straight NCAA championship.

Gary was elected team co-captain for the Olympic men’s swim teams of 1972 and 1976. In 1976, he was selected to carry the American flag in the Opening Ceremony in Montreal. He was the only U.S. Olympic swimmer ever selected for that honor until Michael Phelps in 2016. Gary served as vice president of the U.S. Olympians Association from 2005-2012 and as president of the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians Association from 2012-2016. 

Gary is the author of two highly acclaimed books, Fundamentals of Fast Swimming and Winning Life’s Gold Medal.

Willie Banks

Willie Banks is president of HSJ, Incorporated, a sports management and consulting firm that specializes in marketing and networking between the U.S. and Japan. With vast sports experience, industry knowledge and operational skills for sports businesses, HSJ, Inc. and its network help businesses and individuals implement new programs, develop strategic planning and create fresh marketing tools.

Willie served as the deputy venue director for the 1994 World Cup of soccer and the director of athlete services for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Village. He is famous throughout the world and has represented his country in many ways. Taking note of Willie’s international popularity and outstanding personal character and leadership qualities, Time Magazine once dubbed him “The United States’ ambassador of track and field”.

Though Willie is a former world record holder and Olympian, much of his fame comes from his innovative approach to sports. Willie entertained the crowd and in response the spectators rhythmically clapped while he ran down the runway for his jump. It became so popular that it set a tradition that is mimicked throughout the world to this day.

Willie served as the president of the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians Association from 2005-2013. Willie was elected to the World Athletics Council in 2019, sits on the USA Track & Field Board of Directors, and served on the World Olympians Executive Committee from 2013-2019. He is the former USATF Alumni president and past chairman of the USATF Athletes Advisory Committee.

John Naber

John Naber was America’s most decorated athlete at the Olympic Games Montreal 1876, swimming to four gold medals and one silver. Following his retirement, Naber entered the broadcasting field and served as analyst, reporter and play-by-play tv and radio announcer for more than 30 Olympic sports at ten Olympic Games. He has authored three Olympic-related books and speaks to audiences on how Olympians think and act on the path to making their dreams come true. He was twice elected as president of the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians Association and currently leads a variety of non-profit organizations, including the Olympians for Olympians Relief Fund (OORF), the Koroibos Foundation, “Ready, Set, Gold!” and the Swim with Mike Foundation. In 2020, he was elected to serve on the USOPC Board of Directors. Naber has been passionate about the Olympic Games since visiting Olympia, Greece at age ten. As one of the USOPA past presidents, he hopes to increase participation at the various USOPA chapters, Olympic and Paralympic Day activities and the quadrennial USOPA reunions. He also encourages all USOPA members to help each other during difficult times by donating to, or nominating team members for, OORF grants

William “Bill” Toomey

Bill served as the director of fundraising for the U.S. Olympic Committee. He was also a member of the prestigious Presidential Commission on Olympic Sports. The Commission report resulted in a major restructuring of the Olympic Movement in the U.S., and the passage of the Amateur Sports Act. Bill served two terms on the board of directors of the USOPC. He is co-founder of the World Olympians Association and served as president of the U.S. Olympians Association.

Bill won the 1969 Sullivan Award, which is awarded annually to America’s greatest amateur athlete. He was inducted into the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984 and honored by the University of Colorado as the ALUMNUS OF THE CENTURY.

After the Olympic Games Mexico City 1968, Bill worked for the U.S. Department of State and the Peace Corps. He worked in some 20 countries on behalf of the agencies.
Bill coached for several years at the University of California, and in his second year, won the team championship in the NCAA Division II. His teaching experience included lecturing at Santa Barbara City College.

During the Olympic Games Munich 1972, Bill was the Envoy to the President of the United States. In 1996, he acted as Special Envoy for His Excellency Juan Antonio Samaranch, President of the IOC, in a humanitarian effort involving the government of Ethiopia.

Bill received his bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado and his master’s degree from Stanford University. He co-authored two books with Barry King, The Olympic Challenge 1984 and 1988.