By Todd Kortemeier | May 02, 2018, 12:30 p.m. (ET)
Andrew Weibrecht competes in the men's super-G at the Audi FIS Alpine Ski World Cup on Dec. 5, 2015 in Beaver Creek, Colo.

 

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Citing the stress of spending time away from family, two-time Olympic medalist Andrew Weibrecht retired from ski racing Tuesday, “without regret and ready for the next adventure.”

The 32-year-old from Lake Placid, New York, used Instagram to make a nine-part tribute to his career, posting images of his career highlights, friends, training partners and family. The posts went chronologically from the start of Weibrecht’s career with the U.S. Ski Team in 2002, and closed on an image of he and his daughter, Addy.

Weibrecht made his Olympic debut at the Olympic Winter Games Vancouver 2010, where he finished 21st in downhill but captured a surprising bronze in super-G; his previous best world cup finish before Vancouver was 10 in downhill in 2007.

A series of injuries sidelined him on and off for the next four years, and he missed most of the 2010-11 season.

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As detailed in his Instagram posts, Weibrecht contemplated retirement just before the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 – he was 10th in a super-G world cup race in December 2011, but then never placed higher than 11th leading up to the Games. Then lightning struck twice and he had his best performance on the world stage, capturing Olympic silver in super-G. Weibrecht called the ensuing years the best of his career.

He had a career-best seventh at a world cup stop the month after Sochi, then finished fifth twice the following season. In the 2015-16 season, he finally found the world cup podium – twice – taking third at Beaver Creek, Colorado, in December, and second in Kitzbuehel, Austria, in January.

Though his Olympic medal streak ended in PyeongChang, Weibrecht expressed gratitude for all the places his career has taken him, and was going out the way he wanted.

“Thanks to everybody who has supported me through my career,” his final post read, “I really can’t say enough to show how grateful I am.”

Todd Kortemeier is a sportswriter, editor and children’s book author from Minneapolis. He is a contributor to TeamUSA.org on behalf of Red Line Editorial, Inc.