By Devin Logan, 2014 Olympic Ski Slopestyle Silver Medalist | Feb. 03, 2018, 11:42 a.m. (ET)

 

Devin Logan is a slopestyle skier who won the silver medal at her event’s Olympic debut in 2014. But what sets Logan apart is she also competes in ski halfpipe. The 24-year-old has won two X Games medals in slopestyle, finished on the podium 12 times at world cup events (nine halfpipe, three slopestyle) and earned halfpipe bronze at the 2017 world championships. Follow Logan’s journey to the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 to compete in both events as she writes for TeamUSA.org.

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The last two months have been stressful and exhausting. Since December I competed in five competitions: two world cups and three grand prixs! It was a lot and I was feeling the pressure. Going into the final Olympic qualifier I was tied in second for slopestyle and tied in second for halfpipe.

The Mammoth U.S. Grand Prix was my final chance to get on the podium to qualify for the Olympic team. Mammoth is such a fun mountain and my brother lives there. I got to spend some time with him, which really made me happy. Having some quality family time was just what I needed to ski like myself. The weather can be tricky in Mammoth like we have seen in past years, and at this event we saw that again. We had all kinds of snow and wind that messed with qualifiers so things kept getting pushed back on the schedule.

Halfpipe ended up going off without a hitch and I qualified for halfpipe final and ended up in third place after the final. I stood up on the podium with my good friends Maddie Bowman and Brita Sigourney; I did what I needed to do that night and got a podium to solidify my spot, I had done it! I had qualified for the U.S. Olympic Halfpipe Skiing Team!

 

 

Four years ago I had missed the halfpipe team by one spot and I was pretty bummed about it; in fact, I had been pretty upset about it for the last four years! I felt a huge weight off my shoulders and everyone said that I was even talking differently. After this check off the list I could now focus on slopestyle with no pressure because I was already going to the Olympics.  Qualifying for the Olympic team is pretty tricky and sometimes it even confuses me – throw in two disciplines and it is a complicated math equation.

Heading into slopestyle I was ranked second. I felt pretty good going into slopestyle because I knew that I would have a spot. There was a lot of pressure going into this competition because I had not done as well as I had wanted at the previous Olympic selection events. I had the run that I wanted to do, but I did not do my spins both ways like I usually do. As I mentioned qualifying for the Olympic team can be a complicated math equation. Unfortunately, I did not make finals at the slopestyle grand prix in Mammoth. This bumped me into third place for the rankings for the U.S. Olympic slopestyle team. Technically, that would put me on the team, but you never know until it is all over. I had to wait about a day and the next morning on a layover my coach came up to me and told me that I had made the U.S. Olympic slopestyle team! I was so tired that it didn’t really sink in; in fact, I am still in a little bit of shock that something that I had worked so hard for for the last eight years is now my reality!

See you in Korea!