By Paul D. Bowker | Dec. 09, 2018, 8:04 p.m. (ET)

(L-R) John Shuster, Chris Plys, Matt Hamilton and John Landsteiner pose for a photo after winning gold at the Curling World Cup on Dec. 9 2018, in Omaha, Neb.

 

Team Shuster dropped the hammer on Sweden again.

John Shuster, a four-time Olympian who led the U.S. men’s team to its first Olympic gold medal in curling earlier this year, led the U.S. to a win over Sweden on Sunday in the men’s title match in the Curling World Cup in Omaha, Nebraska. It was a rematch of the Olympic gold-medal match in PyeongChang won by Shuster’s rink by a 10-7 score.

On Sunday, with the match tied 1-1, Shuster put the U.S. in front when he drew the last rock, or hammer, into the circle for a point in the sixth end. He added another point in the seventh end.

When Shuster’s final shot in the eighth end finished the match, he exchanged high fives with his teammates and told them: “Heck of a week.” Joining Shuster were 2018 Olympic teammates Matt Hamilton and John Landsteiner, along with 2010 Olympian Chris Plys.

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The win marked the first title for a U.S. in the inaugural World Cup, and clinched a spot in the World Cup Final for Shuster’s team.

The U.S. took a 1-0 lead when it scored a point in the second end. Sweden tied it 1-1 in the fifth end.

The mixed doubles team of Tabitha Peterson and Joe Polo came up just one point short of qualifying for the title match. They won four of six matches in the tournament. The U.S. is tied with Switzerland for the points lead in mixed doubles after two World Cup stops.

The U.S. women’s team (Jamie Sinclair, Alex Carlson, Monica Walker and 2012 Youth Olympians Sarah Anderson and Taylor Anderson) finished with a 2-3 record.

Japan won the women’s title match Sunday and Norway won in mixed doubles.

The third leg of the World Cup will be held in Jonkoping, Sweden, from January 30 to February 3.

Paul D. Bowker has been writing about Olympic sports since 1996, when he was an assistant bureau chief in Atlanta. He is sports editor of the Cape Cod Times and a freelance contributor to TeamUSA.org on behalf of Red Line Editorial, Inc.