By Stuart Lieberman | July 03, 2017, 1:44 p.m. (ET)
Venus Williams plays a backhand in the ladies singles first round match against Elise Mertens of Belgium at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 3, 2017 in London.

 

With eight Americans seeded in the Wimbledon draw, including five-time champion Venus Williams, Team USA has more seeded players than any other country at the third Grand Slam tournament of the year.

Four Americans are seeded in the men’s singles draw and four in the women’s singles draw, with No. 10 Williams and No. 17 Jack Sock leading the way.

Historically, the U.S. has been the most dominant country at Wimbledon, having won 29 of the 48 women’s singles titles and 15 of the men’s singles titles in the Open Era.

Here’s a look at the top U.S. prospects in this year’s event, which will conclude with the women’s and men’s singles finals on July 15 and 16, respectively.

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Women

With sister Serena out for the remainder of the year due to her pregnancy, the elder Williams comes into Wimbledon as the most decorated American. Always a threat to win on grass, Williams has won five of her seven Grand Slam women’s singles titles at Wimbledon, lifting the suitably named Venus Rosewater dish in 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007 and 2008.

But her 2008 Wimbledon victory was her last Grand Slam singles title.

The oft-injured Williams just turned 37 and continues to live with Sjögren’s syndrome, a condition that causes chronic fatigue and muscle soreness.

However, without her sister on the court, she’ll still be the top contender, and she has the numbers to prove it.

Williams holds a 20-7 record this year with an Australian Open runner-up finish — she lost to Serena in the final — and is 81-14 all-time at Wimbledon. She’s been consistent all year, winning multiple matches in all but one tournament she’s entered, including three matches at the French Open before losing to eventual semifinalist Timea Bacsinszky.

She’ll be joined in the women’s field by No. 17 Madison Keys, a 2015 Wimbledon quarterfinalist who has spent half of this year recovering from surgery on her left wrist. Keys, 22, is still searching for consistency in her career. She made it all the way to the Australian Open semifinals two years ago, but lost during the second round at this year’s French Open.

No. 24 CoCo Vandeweghe also has the chance to make a deep run at Wimbledon, where she reached the quarterfinals in 2015 and the fourth round last year. After losing in the first round of this year’s French Open, the 6-foot-1 big server with a powerful baseline game parted with coach Craig Kardon and began working with Pat Cash, the 1987 Wimbledon champion.

Lauren Davis, who made it to Wimbledon’s third round in 2014, is the final seeded American woman at No. 28.

 

Men

In the men’s field, two-time Olympic medalist Sock will look to rebound from his surprising first-round exit last month in Paris, where he made 39 unforced errors in his opening match. At 24, the heavy forehand hitter is still in search of his first quarterfinals appearance at a Grand Slam event. Despite his flop at Roland Garros, he has already won ATP titles in Auckland and Delray Beach this year, and reached the semifinals at Indian Wells and quarterfinals in Miami.

No. 23 John Isner will look to break through on the grass following three consecutive third-round exits at Wimbledon — the only Grand Slam where he has failed to reach the fourth round — and No. 24 Sam Querrey will try to build on his quarterfinal run last year, which included a shocking third-round upset over top-seeded Novak Djokovic.

Steve Johnson, who reached the fourth round at the event last year, will round out the seeded Americans at No. 26.

 

Doubles

In doubles competition, Olympic Games Rio 2016 gold medalist Bethanie Mattek-Sands of the United States will pair up with the Czech Republic’s Lucie Safarova, as the pair will attempt to make history by capturing their fourth straight major title. The duo already won the Australian Open and French Open this year together, as well as last year’s U.S. Open.

As always, with 16 major titles to their name, Bob and Mike Bryan will be contenders in the men’s doubles competition, but the 39-year-old twins and three-time Wimbledon champions have not won a Grand Slam event since the 2014 U.S. Open. It will be their 19th straight appearance in the event, and they will be seeded fifth.

Stuart Lieberman covered Paralympic sports for three years at the International Paralympic Committee, including at the London 2012 and Sochi 2014 Games. He is a freelance contributor to TeamUSA.org on behalf of Red Line Editorial, Inc.