By Craig Bohnert | Jan. 05, 2017, 11:46 p.m. (ET)
Members of the U.S. team celebrate as they win gold during the 2017 IIHF World Junior Championship against Canada at the Bell Centre on Jan. 5, 2017 in Montreal.


Overcoming a two-goal deficit in the third period, Team USA overcame Canada in a shoot-out to earn its fourth junior ice hockey world championship Thursday evening with a 5-4 victory at the Bell Centre in Montreal.

The victory gives Team USA its fourth junior world title in five gold-medal game appearances, including two wins over Canada on its home soil. It was the second shoot-out win in as many nights for the U.S., which defeated Russia 4-3 in Wednesday’s semifinal contest.

The Americans came into the game with a 3-1 win over Canada less than a week prior under their belts, but it was the Canadians who broke on top first, scoring at 4:38 in the first period when defenseman Thomas Chabot picked up an errant pass to beat Team USA goalkeeper Tyler Parsons, then Jeremy Lauzon cleaned up a loose puck in front of the American net for a 2-0 advantage to the host side.

After playing on their heels in the first 20 minutes, Team USA came out of the first intermission more focused, and it paid off at 3:04 in the period. Charlie McAvoy took a pass from Jordan Greenway and beat Canadian netminder Carter Hart to pull back a goal. Adam Fox’s shot from the point grazed Kieffer Bellows and found its way to the goal at 9:30 to equalize the contest.

Canada took a 3-2 lead on a power-play goal by Nicholas Roy at 1:52, then doubled the lead at 4:05 when Mathieu Joseph went one-on-one to beat Parsons. But the Americans refused to go quietly in the hotly contested match, taking only 38 seconds to mount their comeback, which was kick-started by Bellows’ shot from the slot for a 4-3 score. Fox then found Colin White, whose deflection beat Hart at 7:07 to even the contest and set up the overtime.

Troy Terry emerged as the hero, converting the only goal in the shoot-out as Parsons tallied four saves and one Canadian attempt sailed wide left.