By Craig Bohnert | May 15, 2016, 2:57 p.m. (ET)

Brady Ellison shoots during the recurve men's individual competition at the the second stop of the Archery World Cup on May 15, 2016 in Medellín, Colombia. 


Brady Ellison bounced back from the disappointment of a first-round exit in the world cup opener in Shanghai to take gold in men’s individual recurve at the tour’s second stop Sunday afternoon in Medellin, Colombia.

A two-time Olympian who helped the U.S. to the team silver medal in London, Ellison, ranked No. 7 in the world, faced off against Spain’s Miguel Alvarino Garcia, ranked No. 8, in the gold-medal match. The 27-year-old Ellison made a statement in the first set, posting a perfect 30 against Garcia’s 28. The two matched each other on their first and third shots in the second set with 9s, but Ellison nailed a 10 with his second arrow, while Garcia mustered only an 8, giving the American the second set as well.

In the third set they matched each other arrow for arrow, with Garcia shooting first and scoring 10, 9 and 8. That left the door open for Ellison, who needed only a 9 on his final arrow to win. Instead he scored an 8, tying the Spaniard and splitting the set. In the fourth, Garcia shot three 9s while Ellison scored a 10 on his first arrow, then put his last two in the 9 ring for the victory, 7-1.

It was a solid comeback for the American, who last won an individual outdoor world cup medal at the 2014 World Cup Final. His win there made him the first recurve archer to win three World Cup Finals (2011, 2012 and 2014). At the opening stop of this year’s world cup tour two weeks ago in Shanghai, Ellison took an early exit, losing his opening match to Russia’s Arsalan Baldanov, but didn’t walk away empty-handed as he won mixed team gold with Khatuna Lorig. Winning gold Sunday in Colombia sent a message that he hasn’t lost his form.

In other competition, the U.S. women finished fourth in the recurve team event, falling to No. 4 seed Mexico in the bronze final by a 6-0 margin. Seeded 10th in the competition, the trio of Erin Mickelberry, Lauren Clamon and Anna Miscione edged No. 7 seed India 5-4 to open, then downed No. 2 Chinese Taipei 6-2 in the quarterfinals before falling to eventual silver medalist China, 5-1, in the semis.

In compound, a non-Olympic discipline, the U.S. men’s team of Alex Wifler, Braden Gellenthien and Steve Anderson lived up to its No. 1 seeding by defeating Italy 232-229 Saturday, while the women’s team of Crystal Gauvin, Emily Bee and Dahlia Crook took silver to Colombia in the gold-medal final, 229-222. Gauvin and Wifler missed a bronze in compound mixed team by the smallest of margins, falling to France 150-149.

Reo Wilde earned silver in men’s individual compound, dropping the gold-medal match to Italy’s Sergio Pagni 146-143, while Gauvin lost a shoot-off for the women’s individual gold to Colombia’s Sara Lopez after tying at 146 at the end of regulation.