By Mike Gardner | July 19, 2015, 5:10 p.m. (ET)


MARKHAM, Ontario -- It was a historic day for Team USA as both Andrea Lee and the four-member mixed golf team earned silver medals at the sport’s Pan American Games debut on Sunday at the Angus Glen Golf Club.

“I hadn’t really thought of it until now; that’s really cool,” Lee said on being the first U.S. golfer to win a Pan American Games medal. “I'm excited, I've never gotten a real medal before.”

Lee, 17, finished the last round two strokes over par to finish the tournament 7-under, two strokes behind gold medalist Mariajo Uribe of Colombia. Julieta Granada of Paraguay earned the bronze, finishing 5-under.

“I'm kind of disappointed with how I played today, but hopefully I can learn from my experiences here and play in the next couple of weeks,” Lee said, who had led after Friday and Saturday until her 74 Sunday afternoon.

American Kristen Gillman, 17, finished the day 2-under, shooting a 70 and wrapping up her first major international tournament 3-over, to take sixth place.

In the men’s competition, Lee McCoy, 21, and Beau Hossler, 22, were disappointed with their final-round performances, but placed in the top 10 to help secure the silver medal in the team competition for themselves, Gillman and Lee.

McCoy shot a 69 on the final day to finish 10-under overall – just two strokes shy of a bronze medal – and Hossler ended the tournament 7-under, to finish sixth. Due to his 63 on Saturday, Marcelo Rozo not only won the men’s tournament, but helped clinched the gold medal in the team competition for Colombia.

“I would have liked to win, but any kind of medal is a huge honor,” Hossler said on winning mixed team silver. “It was a really good event. I think we had a really good opportunity to win this week.

“To spend it with three other really good players and to play on an awesome golf course like this is just a huge blessing for all of us.”

The pair of silver medals set a positive tone for the future of U.S. golf players on the international, multi-sport stage, especially with the sport making its return to the Olympic Games next year after a 112-year hiatus.

“It’s about the prestige; it’s about golf being recognized as a sport that travels worldwide,” Hossler said. “I think there’s going to be a lot of countries represented and that’s only going to grow the game. Pretty incredible stuff, I think it will inspire people watching on TV to go buy some golf clubs and go play some golf.”