Scott Blackmun, USOC CEO
On what kind of statement the medal count for Team USA makes:
"Our athletes were well prepared. They had a fantastic games. We really don't view this as a competition between nations as much as a competition between athletes. And our athletes have done a phenomenal job here. Our success here helps us commercially. It helps us with our broadcast. We're thrilled that they did just as well on the field that they did off the field. They represented us very well."

Larry Probst,
USOC chairman
"The team has done a phenomenal job. These athletes have made the entire country proud, and we couldn't be happier with their performance. It's just an awesome experience and we have them to thank for this."

Scott Blackmun, USOC CEO
On how Team USA will attempt to stay on top:

"I think the programs that we put in place after Nagano are having an impact on us today. Jim Paige in particular started what we called our podium program back then. We also completely restructured the way that we approach our support of the national governing bodies in 2000 in that we started working with them in building customized partnerships based on their individual needs. I think what you're seeing here now is in part a result of our efforts to really support our NGB's. In terms of going forward, it's extremely competitive. We need to continue to be better than we are and continue to focus our efforts on providing the resources that the NGB's and the athletes need to be their best."

Angela Ruggiero (Simi Valley, Calif.)
On her experience during her last four Games:
"We won in '98, so for our team that was obviously a high point. Just to have the opportunity to represent your country and obviously winning medals is wonderful. Regardless of that, being able to have the support of the U.S. Olympic Committee and know that you're doing everything possible to put yourself in the best possible position to win. I think that's one of the things that I can say about our team, everyone had those resources and that support. Coming into the games, knowing that you've done everything possible, regardless if you win or you medal or you just participate, it's a great feeling."

On what she would do to make women's hockey more competitive:
"Obviously I feel strongly about this. I think the opportunity is out there. Fortunately, in the U.S. and Canada, there's a lot of support behind our two teams and there's a lot of tradition. That's not to say that tradition and support doesn't exist in other countries, they just have yet to really get behind their women's teams. Giving our sport more time to develop is the most important thing. A lot of sports have had that opportunity. Certainly on the men's side, there's a long growth period from the '20s and '30s to what you're seeing now and how competitive that sport is right now in this tournament. I think our sport just needs a little time to grow and all the other countries that have that tradition just need a little more boost from their federations to really see those results. But it's very possible. There's a lot of women competing out there. You just need that growth period."

Apolo Anton Ohno
(Seattle, Wash.)
On what it's like to be a part of such a successful Team USA:
"I feel very proud to be a part of any Olympic team regardless of medal outcome. As an athlete, with everyone focusing on the medal count, you obviously pay attention. But for me, being an Olympian and what that embodies and what that means signifies something much bigger than the medals that we bring home. We compete for ourselves, we compete for our family and for our sport. But ultimately the United States is sending its absolute best to go compete against the rest of the world and I think more important is how we go out there and how we stand up as warriors. To know that this is the biggest medal haul ever is pretty amazing. All of us here are multiple Olympic team members and to be able to come to back-to-back Games or continuously be able to perform at this level is very, very difficult in any sport. So I think it speaks volumes about the support we have, about the athletes' own determination and that basically anything is possible. For the Games that are coming forth, someone asked about whether staying on top is going to be hard. Obviously it is. Any time you have a target on your back or any time you're looked at as the leader of the group as the U.S., I always feel, clearly is, it makes it very difficult. But our athletes, young and older veterans, are always up for the challenge and anything's possible."

Lindsey Vonn (Vail, Colo.)
On what it's like to be a part of such a successful Team USA:
"For me, this is my third Olympic Games and I'm proud to be a part of any Olympic team. But to see the success that we've had is really inspring. Throughout these Games, I've been watching all of the U.S. athletes do so well and it's been so cool to watch the American flag go up on the podium so many times. It seems like every single competition there's someone from the U.S. up on the podium. All the stories that go behind, all the success and all the hard work that everyone has put in is really paying off. For me, as an athlete and as a spectator, it's very inspiring to see."

Scott Blackmun
, USOC CEO
On medal count versus expectations:
"I wasn't around when the times that medal target would have existed. We had a lot of projections. Those projections changed almost on a daily basis. We're very, very pleased with the results. It would be hard to deny the fact that we've exceeded our expectations here. We've had a fantastic Games, very good on the field of play and off the field of play. Absolutely the team performed fantastically. We expected them to perform fantastically and they did even better than we thought they would."

Billy Demong
(Vermontville, N.Y.)
On what he will take away from the Games:
"Over the last couple years I've had the pleasure of coming up here to train and preview the venues. When I came two years ago I could see it all happening already. It's such a beautiful place and city and to see what they were building especially for my event was perfection. Seeing it all come together and everything done ahead of time. I think these Olympics were a real success in Canada's attempt to show the world that they could put on a best ever kind of Games. It's been a really enjoyable experience from in the sense that everything was dialed in ahead of time and everything was ready.
 
"I think these Olympics were a real success. And lot of Americans came here, so the memory I will take from this is that it was a fantastic games in a beautiful setting put on by a really proud city. And in a little way it was like a North American olympics there were so many enthusiastic fans from the States and also I think the American and Canadians were rooting for each other's teams a little bit. That's a special memory for me."
 
Lindsey Vonn (St. Paul, Minn.)
On what she will take away from the Games:
"Everything was exteremly organized. I think it was great city and great country to host these Olympics. On the alpine side we did have some weather issues but everyone worked extremely hard to get the race condictions in shape the best they could. The fans were were in full forsc in all the events, and the Canadians and Americans alike not only cheering us on but the entire world and you don't get that at every Olympics. I didn't feel that same energy and atmosphere in Torino as I did here in Whistler, so I'm taking away a lot of good memories from these Games it's definetely one of the best Olympics experiences that I've ever had.
 
Apolo Anton Ohno (Seattle, Wash.)
On what he will take away from the Games:
It's been an incredible journey. This one was especially important to me being so close to home, 2 and a half hours from Seattle. I had a lot of friends and family and support from the Northwest area. I grew up skating here so I basically learned to speedskate in this area. I always plan on coming back here.
 
For me to be able to come full circle in my career is very complete. I always plan on coming back to Vancouver. It has felt like a home games for us i think that's part of the reason why we're doing so well because we feel so comfortable here. It feels great. Hopefully someday I can come back here when I have kids and tell them 'daddy was here he broke a record for olympic medals
 
Angela Ruggiero (Simi Valley, Calif.):
On what she will take away from the Games:
It's a beautiful city overall. It's a city I'd love to come back for vacation. Thats what's great about the Olympics you get a chance to show off your city and Vancouver did a great job of that. My view from the Olympic Village was pristine. [I will take away] Getting the opportunity to speak with a lot of the athletes and be a part of the IOC athletes' commission. There was [a lot of] comeraderie of these Games and that's what the Olympics are all about--the athletes and cheering for each other. I was able to get to know a lot of different athletes and see them in the gym and seeing them in the dining hall...so for me it was that comeraderie of the Olympic spirit. Our tournament [women's hockey] was spread out a little more this year so I was able to go to some of the other events and be a part of that Olympic spirit.
 
Lindsey Vonn (Vail, Colo.)
On the tumultuous Games through injury, publicity, etc.:
"It's been an interesting Games and interesting few weeks. Before the Games I felt like I was in great form, I won the last World Cup. With the shin injury not knowing if I'd be able to compete, having a lot of luck with the weather delays and then finally being able to compete in the downhill and being able to win my first gold medal in my favorite discipline was amazing.
 
"There have been a lot of ups and downs...from the shin injury, finger injury...gold medal, crashing, bronze medal, crashing...My goal for these games was to win one medal and i have one gold and one bronze so I am incredibly happy and  proud of those accomplishments. I left it all on the hill and I have no regrets whatsoever. It's been sometimes difficult but at the end of the day i'm leaving these games happy because I gave it evertything I have."
 
Apolo Anton Ohno (Seattle, Wash.)
On questioning the judge's decision to be disqualified from the 500-meter final last night:
"I don't think it was a matter of me questioning the official's call. Someone asked me if I agreed and if I felt like I had done something to impede on the other skater and I said no. At the end of the day my job is to show up as prepared as possible and to my best. This game more than any others, I've been able to go out there regardless of outcome, I can cross the finish line wiht a smile on my face and feel content and have satisfaction that I brought everything i had and poured my heart and soul on into the Olympic Games and the sport so it had no impact on my experience at the Games.
 
"Not everyone can have the podium. I call those who get the podium the top one percenters of the all one percenters in the world and it feels very good to be a part of that. I feel blessed to be here and be healthy."


Mike Plant, Chef de Mission

On the preparation for Sochi 2014:

"The credit for why we prepare the way we do no matter where it is around the world goes to the Olympic committee working closing with the National Governing Bodies. Just like the services and support you heard from the athletes today, it transcends just the performance base, it’s also operationally. We start sending teams actually to Sochi from the leadership this coming year. They start looking at venues and certainly the geography in the area and start to understand years in advance so that when we do get to the Games, we’re probably the best-prepared team. Not just competitively because of the four individuals and the other 212 that came here to compete but Everything we can do in our operation. Then you combine that with the passion and the commitment and dedication and support of all of the rest of our athletes, you come out with a pretty powerful combination. We’ve seen some great results."


Bill Demong (Vermontville, N.Y.)

On preparing for Sochi 2014:

"It’s going to be a little bit different. You can’t get a couple hour flight and go to Sochi. I think there’s an underlying theme. I wanted to touch on something that Larry and Scott talked about in the beginning in terms of how they support the NGB’s. To me it seems like part of the windfall we’re having here and what I think will continue to make the U.S. good at the Winter Olympics is how the USOC is working with NGB’s in sports science and funding and these personal programs because you’re seeing a lot of sports like Nordic combined, biathlon, cross-country—some of them didn’t win medals this Games, but they’re making inroads into the World Cup and the international scene in ways they never have before. It’s kind of that long-term investment that’s been made over these last 12 years since Nagano that’s really starting to see some fruition. One of my best friends from Lake Placid, Tim Burke, wore the yellow jersey in biathlon. He didn’t win a medal, but that kind of a result wasn’t even dreamed of before this season. Regardless of where the Games are there’s a level of expectation and professionalism amongst the athletes on the U.S. team this year that I have seen a significant change over the four Olympics I’ve been to. In Nagano we were a small country at the Olympic Games. We didn’t expect as a whole team—there were teams that expected to medal, but as a whole team you still felt like kind of one of the outsiders in the Winter Olympics. And now we’re here to win. There’s a lot of guys and girls from the United States that feel very comfortable in their sports and amongst their competitors and entitled to doing their best and winning. Regardless of where the Games are we’re doing the right things to bring the right athletes with the right expectations to continue this kind of success."

 

Mike Plant, Chef de Mission

On the preparation for Sochi 2014 in terms of athletes’ safety:

"From the USOC standpoint it’s about a lot of preparation. In these sports there’s a certain element of risk and safety and the aerials. There’s always risk in sport. The international federations—they’re the ones that obviously establish the field of play. We do everything can like a lot of countries do to prepare the athletes and give them that opportunity. Our resources, working with the NGB’s, trying to hire the best coaches in the world. Fortunately  we’ve done very well doing that in a good combination this time. As far as Sochi and the bob and luge track, again that’s those international federations. We’ve all seen some comments here that maybe they’ve learned a few things. Once they make those decisions that are within their jurisdiction, we’ll prepare accordingly."


Scott Blackmun, USOC CEO
On podium success translating into more sponsorship support:
"Obviously our sponsors get more value when there's more American success. We have so many great stories coming from the American athletes at these Games, I think it's going to increase the appetite that our sponsors have for the association of the Olympic brand and our Olympic athletes. Did this help? Absolutely it helped, but the main reason it helped was because of the ideals that our athletes portray out there every day."

Lisa Baird, Chief Marketing Officer
On podium success translating into more sponsorship support:
"We've seen an enormous amount of activation from our sponsors. What they and we are really pleased with is the results. Our partner NBC has done a fabulous job with production, our ratings are up almost 20 percent. What we're seeing is the appetite for all things Olympic growing in the U.S. When we get back, we're going to tell the stories of the athletes. Of course that's a part of it. But it's also how they can achieve their business results with Team USA and with what they can do with the Olympic Games. We'll be back on the road pretty soon."

Bill Demong (Vermontille, N.Y.)
On whether U.S. athletes have an extra gear and drive to win that other countries' athletes lack:
"I'd love to be able to agree with that and prove that. But as somebody who has toiled away here for a long time and come forth and talked myself off the podium a bunch of times, being scared to win and being scared to lose. The way that we got to where we are and were able to do what we did in these Games was by taking it every step of the way, bad or good, to find our way and come to slowly get the results necessary to build ourselves up to the point where we fully knew coming into these Games that we could do this and kind of earned it before we got here. But I do like that story about the 'hell of race for second place" and stuff like that. There are some American athletes who are like that, that Clint Eastwood, movie star mentality. But I have to say I think American athletes are just like anybody else. We work real hard for a real long time to earn the victories."

Apolo Anton Ohno (Seattle, Wash.)
On the impact these Games will have on future generations of athletes:
"There's no guarantees but I think America falls in love with the Winter Games every four years, as do the athletes. The USOC has a saying that 'It's not every four years, it's every day.' I'd like to think that definitely the future generations of Sochi and beyond will receive whatever they need to be the absolute best at the Games. I'd like to see it no other way."

Mike Plant, Chef de Mission
On investing in athletes in the wake of Canada deciding to cut funding programs:
"I think the thing for us is we all recognize in the United States that these are not just four-year programs. The body of the work of the four people that are up here, they've been at it a long time. Billy, obviously, and the Nordic Combined guys are just a great story of just perseverence and learning and commitment that they didn't lose focus on one day standing up on top of that podium. For us, the last four years it was $55 million for our Winter programs working in conjunction with the national governing bodies. They have had a lot of money they invest in the athletes and the teams as well. But it's not just a four-year grind. It's a long-term strategy. I think we would all encourage the Canadian public and government and everyone else that supports these teams to not give up on what they started because it's a long-term type of result. And you add all the elements together. It's not just the funding, it is the research, the science. We've talked about the bobsled and luge track a little bit. Our coaches, within a matter of a couple minutes of our team and our athletes sliding down the track, they have right on their little iPod devices video of that run. So there's a lot of support to try to give the athletes on our team the opportunity to get on the podium."

Scott Blackmun, USOC CEO
On lack of doping talk at Vancouver Games:
"We're not catching it and hopefully that's because it's not going on. It's been an incredibly clean Games. I think anti-doping has become a priority for everybody and I think we're beginning to see results of everybody's hard work to ensure clean competition."

On Olympic Job Opportunities Program:
"I think Home Depot's program was phenomenal and we're very grateful to that program. In addition to providing jobs to our athletes, we're currently training the USOC to be more focused on career transition for our athletes, long-term career opportunities. It's clearly a priority for the USOC to make sure that our athletes are successful not only through the days that they compete, but afterwards."

Lisa Baird, Chief Marketing Officer
On Olympic Job Opportunities Program:
"We announced a new program with Adecco for that opportunity. What it's going to do is give our athletes a mroe diverse set of work experiences which is going to help them prepare for the long term. So we announced the first partner with that, which was Hilton Worldwide. We've had conversations with many of our sponsors up here, which is a great time to do that."

Angela Ruggiero (Simi Valley, Calif.)
On Olympic job opportunities program:
"The Olympic Job Opportunities Program was really instrumental. I know some of my teammates got that opportunity to work for Home Depot over the years. A lot of these Olympic sports get a lot of attention in the OLympic year and then in the yeraas in between it's pretty hard for us to find ways to support ourselves. Every individual is different, depending on where you're going to live and where you want to train. There' s a lot of pieces to the puzzle. But certainly having the support of the USOC, if it's career transition for some of the more elderly players or for some of the players who are just out of college and looking to support themselves, obviously a job opportunity program is important. It's really individual, it depends on the needs, but I always know that I could pick up the phone and call the USOC and say 'this is my situation, what do you think is the right support?'"

Lindsey Vonn (Vail, Colo.)
On Olympic Job Opportunities Program:
"I've also been a recipient of some of the USOC grants and I know that that's helped my family, especially when I was beginning my career. But I also know a lot of athletes that were involved in the Home Depot program and who could not make ends meet while training. So these USOC programs are incredibly helpful for all athletes. I think that the support has gone a long way and has enabled athletes to be able to compete and also make a living. I hope that the support continues. I know it will."