USA Wrestling

A joint venture with USA Judo & USA Wrestling gives visually impaired & disabled wrestlers a chance to try Judo

By USA Wrestling | April 22, 2014, 1:58 p.m. (ET)
Dartanyon Crockett, a blind high school wrestler from Cleveland, Ohio, went on win a medal in judo at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, England.

Visually impaired as well as disabled wrestlers, both male and female, are invited to change their singlet for a judo gi and follow in the footsteps of judo stars like Dartanyon Crockett and Myles Porter, both visually impaired athletes who got their start in wrestling and won medals in judo at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London.

USA Judo has programs and competitions specifically for visually impaired athletes which will give many wrestlers an opportunity to continue their grappling careers long after high school. Meanwhile, USA Judo is looking for talented visually impaired athletes to join elite teams.

Wrestling like Judo is a grappling sport, where visually impaired wrestlers are accustomed to many of the same techniques that are found in Judo; throws, takedowns, pins, chokes and arm bars (no kicking or striking like karate) are used to defeat opponents.

Wrestlers can attend USA Judo’s Senior National Championships, May 3 – 4, in Reno, NV, which includes visually impaired divisions. USA Judo can introduce the athletes to local clubs in their area, many of which have programs for visually impaired athletes. Additionally, wrestlers are invited to the U.S. Olympic Training Center to work out with judoka there for a sampling of the sport.

To learn more, contact USA Judo’s Director of High Performance, Eddie Liddie, eddie.liddie@usajudo.us, or USA Wrestling’s Derek Sikora, at dsikora@usawrestling.org .

To compete in judo as a visually impaired athlete, you must be in one of the following classifications:

Class B1
No light perception in either eye up to light perception, but inability to recognize the shape of a hand at any distance or in any direction.

Class B2
From ability to recognize the shape of a hand up to visual acuity of 20/600 and/or a visual field of less than 5 degrees in the best eye with the best practical eye correction.

Class B3
From visual acuity above 20/600 and up to visual acuity of 20/200 and/or a visual field of less than 20 degrees and more than 5 degrees in the best eye with the best practical eye correction.
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