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Mar 07 Shoji Reaches Exclusive Grand Club

Oct. 21, 2009, 9:03 p.m. (ET)

Bill Kauffman
Manager, Media Relations and Publications
Phone: 719-228-6800
E-Mail: bill.kauffman@usav.org

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (Oct. 21, 2009) – Dave Shoji has built a grand women’s volleyball program at the University of Hawaii after taking over as its head coach in 1975 at the age of 28. After a four-set Rainbow Wahine victory over New Mexico State University on Oct. 17, Shoji celebrated his grand program with his 1,000th-career victory.

Shoji is only the second NCAA Division I women’s volleyball coach to earn 1,000 victories. He has led the powerhouse Hawaii program to all but nine of its victories as he took over the second-year program in 1975. During his tenure, he holds a 1001-175-1 record with four national titles (AIAW in 1979, NCAA in 1982, 1983, 1987). Hawaii has reached the NCAA championships eight times (two runner-up finishes) with Shoji at the helm. The Rainbow Wahine have posted 17 30-plus-win seasons and reached at least 20 wins 30 times.

UCLA’s Andy Banachowski was the first achieve the 1,000-victory feat. He currently holds a 1096-298 record in his 43rd year as the Bruin women’s volleyball head coach. Al Scates, the UCLA men’s head volleyball coach, holds a 1,185-253 record in 47 years with the Bruins. Larry Bock, the head coach at NCAA Division III Juniata College, has the most victories at any level of NCAA volleyball with a 1,206-184 record leading the Eagles women’s volleyball program the past 33 years. Bock also had a 100-91 record in five seasons leading the Juniata men’s volleyball program.

Dave Shoji celebrates his 1,000th victory with his University of Hawaii squad. Photo courtesy of University of Hawaii Athletic Media Relations. Courtesy of Hawaii Athletic Media Relations Dave Shoji celebrates his 1,000th victory with his University of Hawaii squad. Hawaii, now 16-2 in 2009 and ranked third in the latest AVCA Division I Coaches Top 25 Poll, is looking to reach the NCAA Tournament for the 28th time in 29 years. Shoji’s squad has won 14 consecutive conference titles and appeared in 10 of the last 11 NCAA regionals. Overall, the Rainbow Wahine have made 22 NCAA regional round appearances.

Shoji has mentored 40 All-Americans during his 35 years at Hawaii. He was named USA Volleyball All-Time Great Coach in 2002. His coaching peers have recognized him as conference coach of the year and AVCA Region Coach of the Year nine times. After leading the Rainbow Wahine to their first NCAA title in 1982 with a 33-1 record, he was selected as the National Coach of the Year. In its quarter century celebration, the NCAA named Shoji coach for its 25th anniversary team.

For several years, Shoji pulled double-duty as he was also responsible for the start of the Hawaii men’s volleyball program. He served as the school’s first head coach from 1978 to 1985, compiling an 81-48 record. The Warriors also claimed the 1980 Western Collegiate Volleyball Conference title under Shoji’s direction.

The name Shoji surname has also become a fixture on USA Volleyball High Performance squads. His two sons – Kawika and Erik, have graced USA Volleyball National Team pipeline rosters six teams and are currently members of the Stanford University men’s volleyball team. Kawika, a senior setter for the Cardinal, was a member of the 2004 and 2005 U.S. Boys’ Youth National Teams and the 2006 and 2007 U.S. Men’s Junior National Teams. Meanwhile, brother Erik, a sophomore libero for Stanford, has been a member of the 2008 and 2009 U.S. Boys’ Youth National Teams. Dave Shoji’s daughter Cobey works at Stanford as its women’s volleyball program director of operations.

Coverage of Dave Shoji’s 1,000th Victory

University of Hawaii Athletics

ESPN.com (including interview with Robyn Ah Mow-Santos)

USA Today Hawaii-NMSU Recap

Honolulu Star-Bulletin Hawaii-NMSU Recap

Honolulu Advertiser Hawaii-NMSU Recap

Honolulu Star-Bulletin Editorial

Honolulu Star-Bulletin Editorial

Honolulu Advertiser (Governor Signs Proclamation)

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