USA Field Hockey Weekly Report-Week of March 21, 2011

March 22, 2011, 10:55 a.m. (ET)
Ed
Week of March 21, 2011

USA Field Hockey Weekly Report-Week of March 21, 2011

Japanfinal
 
 
Outcome of USA Field Hockey Japanese Disaster Relief Fund Campaign Impressive Last week we initiated a fundraising relief fund for Japan that was directed through the American Red Cross. Our goal was to raise $5,000. To date (as of Monday the 21st) we have raised $7,837.01. That number speaks highly of the generosity of USA Field Hockey members. Your empathy directed toward the Japanese is huge, and we thank you for your generosity. The link is still open if you would care to help our Japanese allies and friends in this time of need. The following is from our announcement of last week:

 

USA Field Hockey working alongside Firstgiving.com and the American Red Cross (ARC) has established a link for you to contribute directly to the American Red Cross Japan Disaster Relief Fund. USA Field Hockey will donate $2,000 to this effort and are hopeful you will donate what you can to help us achieve a fundraising goal of $5,000. All donations are tax-deductible and will service a legitimate humanitarian need. Click here to donate.

The Japanese Women’s National Team will be in the USA in late April to play against the USA Women’s National Team. At that time, a large check representing the amount donated to the American Red Cross Japan Disaster Relief Fund will be presented to the Japanese team along with mementos that express our concern.

Grassroots Development for U12 It is not a new problem, and we are re-visiting it again. The development of young people into the sport is an issue, especially boys. Over the years, various campaigns have been launched to try to interest boys in hockey. Most, if not all, have generated lackluster interest mostly due to their ‘one-off nature’. One-off means that the programs were launched for a short duration and there was little follow-up or sustainability to the programs. We are re-visiting  the issue once again and in the next several weeks will ask clubs through a survey what their perception of the problem is and how to remedy it in this country. Our take is that (1) there are elements of sport participation by boys that are cultural (young boys think of the sport as a girls sport), (2) Title IX has created ‘Showcasing’ as its most driving component for girls within USA Field Hockey, and (3) the USA Field Hockey National Office cannot drive this effort from its position; it must be a grassroots effort with local people driving it from the local level for a long period of time. The USA Field Hockey National Office must provide the tools. What should the tools be?

From where we stand, the most important moving part of the local grassroots development piece is without a doubt people who will spend years and years in grassroots building. Parents who have children that grow out of the sport after their school-term participation cannot be counted on for the long term generally, unless they have the passion to grow the sport as a general mindset. Normally it cannot just be one person locally involved, but rather a set of people with a similar mind-set for growth. If one leaves then there are always others to continue the game.

Our efforts within USA Field Hockey will revolve around the development of tools to help you grow the sport locally and on a sustained basis. Tools might be financial incentives of some sort. The incentives may be the possible provision of equipment. Or, perhaps training tools such as videos. Or, all of the above. There are a wide assortment of potential tools.

Throughout the past months, we have been saying a major key to growth will be through the existing club system with an eye toward growing more clubs throughout the USA. Our surveys will continue to be directed to club principals because clubs know the business well, and we are counting upon the collective club thoughts. Actually, this is the most fun of this job for all of us. To develop plans, implement them, and watch for their successes over the years.

I couldn’t find any humorous quotes that seemed appropriate this week, so in lieu of humorous, I went inspirational. Here goes:

"Dreams are made possible if you try."—Terry Fox

“Pain is weakness leaving the body.” —Daniel R. Evans

“Winners never quit and quitters never win.” —Vince Lombardi

“The difference between a warrior and an ordinary man is that a warrior sees everything as a challenge, while an ordinary man sees everything as either a blessing or a curse.” —Don Juan

“Never forget your beginner's spirit.” —Zhi Jie

“Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever.”—Lance Armstrong

“A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for.” —William Shedd

“Limits, like fears, are often just an illusion.” —Michael Jordan

“There is no failure, only feedback.” —Robert Allen

“If you go to work on your goals, your goals will go to work on you. If you go to work on your plan, your plan will go to work on you. Whatever good things we build end up building us.” —Jim Rohn

“It's supposed to be hard. If it wasn't hard, everyone would do it. The hard... is what makes it great.” —Jimmy Dugan (Tom Hanks), A League of Their Own

“Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” —Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Somewhere in the world someone is training when you are not. When you race him, he will win.” —Tom Fleming

“To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.” —Steve Prefontaine

“Man imposes his own limitations; don’t set any.” —Anthony Bailey

“Someday you will not be able to do this. Today is not that day.” —Dane Rauschenberg

“If you’re going to doubt something, doubt your limits.” —Don Ward

“Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.”—Mahatma Gandhi

“Adversity causes some men to break; others to break records.” —William Arthur Ward

“People do not decide to become extraordinary. They decide to accomplish extraordinary things.” —Sir Edmund Hillary

“Don’t tell me the sky is the limit, there are footprints on the moon.” —Dorothy Parker

“The will to win means nothing without the will to prepare.” — Sun Tzu

"If you can't run, then walk. And if you can't walk, then crawl. Do what you have to do. Just keep moving forward and never, ever give up." —Dean Karnazes

“Most people run a race to see who is fastest. I run a race to see who has the most guts.” —Steve Prefontaine

“I am building a fire, and every day I train, I add more fuel. At just the right moment, I light the match.”—Mia Hamm

“To win without risk is to triumph without glory.” —Pierre Corneille

“Happiness is not a state to arrive at, but a manner of traveling.” —Margaret Lee Runbeck

“Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.” —Chinese Proverb

“Risk more than others think is safe. Care more than others think is wise. Dream more than others think is practical. Expect more than others think is possible.” —Claude T. Bissell

"What are you prepared to do?" — Jimmy Malone (Sean Connery), The Untouchables

"Luck is when preparedness meets opportunity.” — Earl Nightingale

Have a great week!


Steve Locke

Executive Director

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