USA Curling

Curling is a sport where players slide granite stones down a sheet of ice toward a target, known as the “house.” Teams score points through positioning their stones closer to the center of the target than the opposing team. Sweeping is used to increase the distance and/or influence the path the stone travels.

Click here to view a short video, Dare to Curl, which contains an overview of the sport. More information can also be found by clicking through the links on this page.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Curling opportunities exist for males and females of all age groups. Twenty four-pound “junior stones” are available at many clubs for younger children to use.
  • Curlers come from all walks of life, and value the special camaraderie integral to the sport. The game has appeal as both a social outlet and a competitive sport.
  • Curling can be played with either a sliding delivery or a standing/sitting delivery using a delivery stick. The use of the delivery stick opened the sport to wheelchair curlers and those with other physical challenges that prevent them from using the traditional sliding position.
  • Curling is played in more 165 clubs in approximately 40 states.  Click here to find a USA Curling member club near you.
  • There are approximately 16,000 curlers registered with the United States Curling Association. Wisconsin has the largest concentration of curlers, with nearly 4,000; Minnesota follows closely with approximately 3,500. There are also substantial numbers of curlers along the East Coast. In recent years, the sport has seen marked growth on both the West Coast and in the South. Curling can now be found states such as California, Florida, Texas, Arizona, and Mississippi.
  • Local curling clubs and their members are the heart of curling. Clubs set up weekly leagues throughout the season, typically October through March. Summer curling and year-round curling is growing in popularity.
  • Many curlers also look forward to weekend tournaments—or bonspiels—where they often form lasting friendships with curlers from other clubs. Camaraderie is also enjoyed off the ice, where curlers absorb the warmth of the clubroom, socializing, and recounting their games.