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USA Bobsled and Skeleton

Ten facts about Team USA Bobsled and Skeleton

Aug. 13, 2014, 4:22 p.m. (ET)

Ten facts about Team USA Bobsled & Skeleton


10 – Olympic medals won by Team USA bobsledders since 2002. The Americans won three medals at the 2002 Salt Lake City Games, one at the 2006 Torino Games, two in Vancouver in 2010 and four in Sochi last February. 

9 – Total combined Olympic appearances by the men’s and women’s skeleton athletes that competed in the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.  Katie Uhlaender made her third Olympic appearance in Sochi.. Other appearances included Noelle Pikus-Pace (2nd appearance), John Daly (2nd appearance), Matt Antoine (1st appearance) and Kyle Tress (1st appearance.)


8 – Olympic medals won by the Team USA men’s and women’s skeleton team. With two medals at the 2014 Sochi Games, (Noelle Pikus-Pace – silver medal; Matt Antoine – bronze medal), the Americans managed to keep their distance from Great Britain (six total medals) for most all-time skeleton medals. 


7 – Olympic medals won by Team USA in the two-man bobsled event. Teammates Steven Holcomb and Steve Langton won the bronze medal in the 2014 Sochi Games, ending a 62-year American drought in the event. Team USA dominated the event after its introduction to the Winter Olympic Games in the 1932 Lake Placid Games. The Americans won six medals in the first four Winter Olympic Games (two in 1932 Lake Placid, two in 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen, one in 1948 St. Moritz and one in 1952 Oslo.) 


6 – Medals won by  USA Bobsled & Skeleton athletes at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games (four-man bobsled bronze, two-man bobsled bronze, women’s bobsled silver and bronze, men’s skeleton bronze and women’s skeleton silver.)


5 – Medals won by Team USA in the women’s bobsled Olympic event. The U.S. has earned a medal in every Olympics since the women’s bobsled event was introduced at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games. The Americans lead the overall medal count in this event. Canada and Germany have each won three medals, while Italy has won one medal. 


4 – Number of stops on the 2014-2015 bobsled North American Cup. The circuit will begin in November and will feature stops in Calgary, Park City and Lake Placid. 


3 – Olympic medals won by Steven Holcomb, Patrick Martin and John Heaton, which is the most for any American in the sports of bobsled and skeleton. Holcomb (gold medal, four-man, 2010 Vancouver; bronze medal, four-man, 2014 Sochi; bronze medal, two-man, 2014 Sochi), Martin (gold medal, four-man, 1948 St. Moritz; silver medal, four-man, 1952 Oslo; silver medal, two-man, 1952 Oslo), Heaton (silver medal, skeleton, 1928; silver medal, skeleton, 1848; bronze medal, two-man bobsled, 1932).


2 – The two-man bobsled event was introduced as an Olympic event at the 1932 Lake Placid Games. Team USA has collected seven medals in the event, including winning six of the first 12 medals awarded. (Hubert Stevens, Curtis Stevens – gold medal, 1932 Lake Placid; John Heaton, Robert Minton – bronze medal, 1932 Lake Placid; Ivan Brown, Alan Washbond – gold medal, 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen; Gilbert Colgate, Richard Lawrence – bronze medal, 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen; Frederick Fortune, Schuyler Carron – bronze medal, 1948 St. Moritz; Stanley Benham, Patrick Martin – silver medal, 1952 Oslo; Steven Holcomb, Steve Langton – bronze medal, 2014 Sochi)

1 – Americans who have won multiple medals in the skeleton competition at the Olympic Games. John Heaton, who has two silver medals to his name, reached the podium at the 1928 St. Moritz Games and the 1948 St. Moritz Games. His two Olympic medals ties him with Russia’s Alexander Tretiakov, Latvia’s Martins Dukurs and Switzerland’s Gregor Stähli for the most skeleton medals in history. Bronze medalist Matt Antoine, who reached the podium at the 2014 Sochi Games, has his sights set on the 2018 Pyeong Chang Games, where he will attempt to join the group as one of the most decorated skeleton athlete in history. 


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