No Word Yet On U.S. Bid City For 2024 Games

By Amy Rosewater | June 10, 2014, 6:57 p.m. (ET)

Scott Blackmun attends a press conference at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games on Feb. 22, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun gave reporters high marks for their efforts to whittle down information regarding a possible 2024 U.S. bid to play host to the Olympic Games but he and chairman Larry Probst remained mum when it came to naming any potential cities in the running.

Following a quarterly board meeting — this one held in Boston — Probst said only that there could be some news regarding the bid cities within about 10 days. Probst said the board was contacting cities that were interested in hosting the Games. A decision as to whether the USOC will bid at all for the 2024 Games is not expected to be made for about another six months.

In a teleconference following the board meeting with media members, Probst and Blackmun said they were doing their best to eliminate any unnecessary spending on behalf of the cities. It was for that reason that no cities made presentations nor shared written reports during the board meeting.

The International Olympic Committee will be accepting bids for the Games in 2015 and the decision is expected to be made in 2017.

What the USOC was interested in discussing, however, was its five-year, $5.2 million funding plan to focus on an independent agency to investigate sexual abuse and harassment in Olympic and Paralympic sports.

Blackmun said the USOC was seeking an additional $10 million to $15 million in funding to contribute to the effort. The USOC and the national governing bodies will share the initial funding costs. The hope, Blackmun said, is to get the initiative up and running in 2015.

“We think the issue is important enough and broad enough that we shouldn’t be the sole funders of this initiative,” Blackmun said. “So we’re going to go out and look for other like-minded organizations and people who want to support this effort.”

All national governing bodies will be required to participate in the program.

Amy Rosewater is a freelance writer and editor for TeamUSA.org. A former sports reporter for The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer, she covered her fifth Olympic Games in Sochi. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and USA Today. Material from various news services and press releases from National Governing Bodies was used to compile this report.

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