Apr 24 Jessica Luscinski To Serve As Team USA Young Ambassador For Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games

By United States Olympic Committee | April 24, 2014, 3:03 p.m. (ET)


Jessica Luscinski poses for a photo at the Young Ambassadors Seminar in March 2014 in Nanjing, China.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The United States Olympic Committee today announced USA Triathlon’s Jessica Luscinski as Team USA’s Young Ambassador for the 2014 Youth Olympic Games, where more than 90 U.S. athletes are expected to compete from August 16-28 in Nanjing, China. Developed by the International Olympic Committee in 2010, the Young Ambassador Program identifies individuals to provide support and motivation to members of National Olympic Committee delegations in the lead up to and during the Youth Games.

A native of Bedford, N.H., Luscinski, 23, is the NCAA and collegiate coordinator at USA Triathlon. Previously, she served in the USOC’s international games division, where she assisted Team USA with behind-the-scenes logistics and registration in the lead up to the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games. A former collegiate and professional soccer player, Luscinski also coached at the NCAA Division III level and formerly served as the youth national team coordinator at U.S. Soccer.

“I am honored to represent Team USA as the Young Ambassador for the Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games and look forward to working with our athletes as they expand their understanding of different cultures and the Olympic Movement,” Luscinski said. “The Youth Olympic Games offer an unparalleled opportunity to educate, inspire and develop our young athletes into future leaders in both their sport and their communities, and I am excited help our athletes experience all the Youth Olympic Games have to offer.”

As Team USA’s Young Ambassador, Luscinski will be responsible for encouraging American athletes to participate in the Culture and Education Program, while supporting Charlie Paddock in his role as U.S. chef de mission. She will also maintain a Games report to be provided to the IOC, speak at sport organizations and schools about the cultural impact of the Youth Olympic Games, and participate in youth sports forums.

Luscinski was selected from a pool of candidates between the ages of 18-25 who are employed by the USOC, a U.S. National Governing Body or a U.S. Olympic Training Site.

“I’d like to congratulate Jessica on this honor and thank her for accepting the responsibility of representing Team USA in Nanjing,” said Paddock, who served as the Team USA Young Ambassador at the 2012 Winter Youth Olympic Games. “The IOC’s Young Ambassador Program is a fantastic way to spread the educational and social principles of Olympism, and Jessica is a perfect fit for this role. I am excited to watch her support our athletes as they learn and compete in Nanjing.”

While each participating athlete will strive to reach the podium at the Nanjing Youth Olympic Games, Team USA’s primary focus for this event will be to strive for excellence on and off the field of play, while also fully participating in the CEP activities hosted by the Organizing Committee. The competition will provide invaluable experience to American athletes and serve as a building block for Team USA’s future international success.

Also joining Luscinski in Nanjing will be five American athletes who were named to the list of 37 Athlete Role Models by the IOC on March 17, including Olympic fencer Miles Chamley-Watson, two-time Olympic rowing champion Erin Cafaro, two-time Olympic weightlifter Kendrick Farris, five-time Olympic archer Khatuna Lorig and Olympic long jump champion Dwight Phillips.  

The IOC also selected American golfer Michelle Wie, 24, to its list of Youth Olympic Games Ambassadors. At age 10, Wie became the youngest player to qualify for the USGA Women’s Amateur Public Links Championship. She then turned professional at age 15 and now competes on the LPGA Tour. Golf will be featured on the program for the Nanjing 2014 Games ahead of its return to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

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