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Established in 1979, the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame celebrates the achievements of America’s premier athletes in the Modern Olympic Games. The first U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame class was inducted in 1983 and includes Jesse Owens, Wilma Rudolph and the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” men’s ice hockey team. Annual additions to the Hall of Fame continued through 1992, and in 2004, after a 12-year hiatus, the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame was revived through the support of Allstate Insurance Company as the presenting sponsor. Allstate hosted induction ceremonies in Chicago in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2012.

Hall of Fame nominees are selected by a seven-person nominating committee consisting of athletes, distinguished U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame members, media and historians. U.S. Olympic Committee representatives select finalists for the online ballot and voting weight is divided among select U.S. Olympic family and media, U.S. Olympians and fans.

Categories

The Hall of Fame is comprised of six categories, each with different qualifications and processes for induction. For the individual, team and coach categories, a person or team may not be considered for the Hall of Fame until six years after Olympic competition. Veterans may not be considered until 24 years after competition. In total, the Hall of Fame includes 94 Olympians, five Paralympians, 10 teams (133 members), four coaches, 10 veterans, 16 contributors and two Olive Branch award inductees.

Individual Sport/Event: An individual cannot be considered for the Hall of Fame until six years following his or her last Olympic competition. Individuals must have formally retired from Olympic competition, although the USOC recognizes an athlete may retire and return to competition. Team sport athletes may also be considered if they have medaled in multiple Games. Up to six athletes may be included in an induction class in this category.

Team: A team cannot be considered for the Hall of Fame until six years after it last competed in an Olympic Games or Olympic Winter Games. A team consists of two or more athletes competing in an Olympic event as a unit. Only one team may be included in an induction class.

Paralympic: A Paralympic athlete, team or coach may not be considered for the Hall of Fame until six years after he or she last competed or last participated in a Paralympic Games or Paralympic Winter Games. Only one candidate from this category may be included in an induction class.

Coach: An individual may not be considered for the Hall of Fame until six years after he or she last coached a U.S. Olympic Team or individual at the Olympic Games or Olympic Winter Games as the “coach of record” and served as part of the official U.S. Olympic delegation. Only one candidate from this category may be included in any induction class.

Veteran: An individual or team may not be considered for the Hall of Fame until six quadrennials (24 years) after competing at an Olympic Games or Olympic Winter Games. Only one candidate from this category may be inducted in any induction class.

Special Contributor: To be eligible, an individual must have demonstrated extraordinary service to enhancing the Olympic Movement in the United States. He or she cannot be a current member of the USOC staff or board of directors. Any service to the Olympic Movement under consideration must exclude paid employment by the USOC or an NGB. Only one candidate from this category may be included in any induction class.